Sunday, 16 September 2012

Quick knitting question please

I'm really hoping the knitting experts out there can help me with a question. The answer is probably really obvious, but even though I've almost been knitting for a year now...I'm still trying to figure out how exactly to interpret patterns!

Looking at the below instructions, after casting on would you:

a) Just work a total of 37 rows in keeping with the 4-row pattern?

or

b) Work one pattern (4 rows) and then work another 37 rows on top of that? This would mean that you would work 41 rows in total.


If it's just 37 rows in total, does this mean that technically the 'instructions' begin at 'From 1st to 4th row sets patt...' and that it just outlines Rows 1- 4 at the beginning to familiarise you with the pattern?

Please do humour me if I'm asking a stupid question, any advice will be much appreciated!

Are you knitting anything at the moment? As the evenings start to draw in here in the UK, I'm feeling increasingly attracted to my knitting needles and yarn...

28 comments:

  1. I read this as 1 -4 are detailed to explain the pattern, and then you continue in the detailed pattern for 37 more rows.

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  2. Hi there, I've only recently discovered your blog, so I think this might be my first comment.

    Personally I would just knit 37 rows, and then start the decreases as described, while still keeping the 4 row pattern going. Sometimes knitting patterns aren't clear at all! What is it you're knitting? How do the pattern instructions compare with the photo of the item?

    I've usually got something on my knitting needles, although when the weather is nicer I'm less keen. I've just started knitting a tweedy skirt, which is looking good so far, now I've got the stitch pattern mastered!

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  3. It means work 4 rows in rib, then do another 37 rows following that pattern. So 41 rows in total.

    You also have to decrease a stitch at each end after the fifth row (or the nineth row in total) and then again every eighth row after that.

    Does that make sense? It took me sooo long to learn how to read patterns, it's not easy!

    X

    sittingonherbumbaleerie.blogspot.co.uk


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    1. I'm not a super-experienced pattern reader, but I agree with Eilidhbelle.

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  4. Sorry I can't help, I get extra confused with knitting instructions as well. I usually plea for help on twitter and manage to get through.

    I have some knitting in my basket but haven't touched it in ages. It might be that winter approaching I'll re-start it.

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  5. Hi Marie! This pattern means that you knit a further 37 rows after the four you have just knitted. You continue the pattern of the 4 rows that you've already started, just continue to work these in order until you're told to stop! If you have any more questions I'm happy to help! :)
    Katie xx

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  6. Hi Marie! This pattern means that you knit a further 37 rows after the four you have just knitted. You continue the pattern of the 4 rows that you've already started, just continue to work these in order until you're told to stop! If you have any more questions I'm happy to help! :)

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    1. Yup, I agree! You've set up your pattern (the four row repeat) and you are following (continue in pattern) it to make a certain type of fabric. Any time there is segmented instructions like this - the four rows row by row and then a number - the pattern wants you to follow them as separate instructions.

      You'll finish this section in the middle of a four row pattern repeat, but that's fine. It will have been accounted for in whatever happens next in the pattern (I assume some shaping?). It may well say 'continuing in pattern, knit another number of rows' only this time increasing at the edges.

      I'm happy to help with more questions, too, if you have them!

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  7. I would take it to mean what you've put as "a)work a total of 37 rows keeping with the 4 row pattern". Also, with decreases like that (or increases) I find it handy to make up a chart/table to mark off the rows as I do them. I would put a * at the rows that I need to do decreases on, so I know the decrease rows when I come to them. I hope that makes sense!!

    I always have knitting on the go, as I knit more than sew. At the minute I'm knitting a cardigan, the pattern is called Lauriel and it's from Little Red In the City by Ysolda Teague. I'm also making a brioche scarf. If you're on Ravelry, my username there is ozzyblackbeard. What pattern are you making, and good luck with it!

    Lynne :)

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  8. I'm pretty sure its 37 total, good luck!

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  9. Hmm, I hate when patterns are confusing! I think I'd go with option B. The first 4 rows establish the pattern, so that you have a pattern set when working the 37 rows.
    Are there any other clues? Does it specify the length anywhere? You might be able to work out how many rows you are meant to work from the length it's meant to be and the row gauge.
    Hope you get it sorted :)
    Ashley x

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  10. I can see how this is confusing! I would say a total of 37 rows. That's because you should be ending this section on a decrease row. So, initial 4 rows + 5th row (decrease) leaves you with 32 stitches left. 32 is divisible by 8, which is what you want to see since you're decreasing every 8th row. This doesnt work with 41, because 41-5=36, and 36 is not divisible by 8, so you would not be ending the section on a decrease row.

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    1. Oops, sorry! I meant 32 rows, not stitches. Early in the morning here...

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  11. Hi Marie, it means knit the first 4 rows as described to "set" the pattern, and then continue for another 37 rows in the same pattern. You can tell because it says "keeping continuity of pattern as set" which is what you did in the first 4 rows xx

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  12. I would interpret it as the first 4 rows are given to establish the pattern, and you knit a total of 37 rows in total. Hope that helps.

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  13. I read it as option b. But the wording isn't totally clear. Is there any other info that could help you double check? If you had the finished length of the piece and the row tension, you could do a little maths? Or ask on Ravelry?

    P.S its not a stupid question - I find all the yarn companies have a slightly different writing style which can sometimes make it harder to figure out what they mean.

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  14. Option B. They set the pattern for the first 4 rows and then require another 37 following the pattern. (I quite enjoy complicated knitting patterns, it's like a puzzle!)

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  15. Hmm. I'd read it as 37 rows total. But--it's strange to me that the pattern calls for an odd number of rows when the pattern stitch takes four rows. Perhaps if I knew more about the entire pattern it would make sense. I'm accustomed to patterns saying to knit until the piece measures x number of inches.

    I'm not sure it matters. As long as you end at the right point in the pattern stitch to do the next bit of shaping or whatever, and as long as the piece is a good length for you, either one could be OK.

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  16. Unfortunately the instructions are ambiguous, you will need to read a bit further along into the instructions and hopefully a bit of calculating (using either the number of stitches you should end up with, or the length + row gauge, or probably both) will tell you whether you need to do 37 or 41 rows. As 'Desert Lily' says, it probably won't matter as long as you end up with the right length for the bit you are knitting. Knitting is very forgiving!

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  17. It can be interpreted differently by everyone. The designer wasn't concerned enough to be clear. It doesn't really matter, the four rows won't make a big difference over all. Just do your best to match this to the front where it will be joined at the seam.

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  18. I think it's 41 rows total while decreasing every 5th and following 8th row whilst working in the 4 row pattern... So I think it's meant to say decrease on rows 5, 8, 13, 16, 21, 24, 29, 32, 37, 40, but that's counting rows in batches of 8, not 4. That looks really confusing, but if you're supposed to have 57 sts at the beginning and decrease 10 times, you should have 47 sts after that chart. Hopefully it tells you how many sts you're supposed to have afterwards...

    Knitting patterns need to be more direct! I'm not an expert, but I'm definitely beyond beginner and that is far too unclear.

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  19. I would do 41 in total. You work through the first four rows to learn the pattern then "proceed as follows" with the additional 37 rows. That is how I read it! Whatever you do just make sure you do the same amount of rows as you did with the front so they match up.

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  20. I really don't know which it is, and after reading the comments am even more confused! It's interesting that people think it could go either way. Good luck!

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  21. I'd knit 37 rows in total and then check the length. You can always knit another 4 rows if you aren't happy with the length. Oh, and keep a note of what you do, so if there is a matching piece you'll remember to do the same number of rows for it so that it will actually match! Good luck.

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  22. I'd say the first 1-4 rows are part of the 37 row count. This reminds me, this is why I stopped knitting!

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  23. Hello there
    I noticed your question, which I can help with. Please note that I like to write out information in full, (even though it is obvious – just one of my annoying habits!!) so here goes:

    1. Cast on 57 stitches, using the thumb method as specified.

    2. The pattern is made up/done/worked over 4 rows, using various combinations of knit and purl stitches.

    3. So what is meant by working the 37 stitches, actually means that for row 5 – you will repeat the instructions as stated for row 1, for row 6 – repeat row 2, for row 7 – repeat row 3 and for row 8 – repeat row 4. Then you start the pattern all over again, i.e. when you work row 9 – you will be repeating row 1 etc. You will continue this until you reach row 37 – which should end up as repeating row 4. Make sense?

    4. However, at the same time, you will need to keep track of decreasing stitches at certain rows (a row counter helped me when I used to do knitting, or write it down, at which rows you’ll need to decrease the stitches if that helps!!) So in other words, at rows 5 and row 13 respectively, you will be decreasing stitches at the beginning and end of each row. But remember to keep track of the pattern you are knitting – so for example at the beginning of row 9, as the k1 has been decreased (which you would have done at the beginning of row 5), therefore you will p1 straight away and continue the rest of the pattern and at the end you’ll p1 too (because you decreased the k1 stitch at row 5). Makes sense?

    5. It would have been helpful to know how many stitches remain after working the 37 rows. That would give a better idea to count the amount of stitches remaining as it goes along.

    Hope that helps.

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  24. I cannot help but I feel your pain!! I'm a novice sewer too and just don't get vintage knitting patterns (but understand the sewing ones!!).

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  25. Hi sweetheart, hope you're all good. Just wanted to say thanks so much for your sweet comment on my sewing classes post, it was much appreciated. Zoe xxx

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